“Spotlight on Demolition” Five North Side Worker’s Cottages Facing Demolition. By John Morris, Chicago Patterns

As spring is in full bloom, so too is the traditional hot season for real estate. Unfortunately this also means some of Chicago’s historic housing stock gives way to new construction, much of it concentrated in near North and Northwest Side neighborhoods that developed in the 1870s and 1880s.

Last year we explored this phenomenon in The Emergence, Demolition, and Preservation of Italianate Cottages and Flats. Unsurprisingly, the trend continues in 2018 and isn’t slowing down. Those on the upper end of the income spectrum continue relocating closer to the city center, and with them, demands for high-end finishes and plentiful space.

As spring is in full bloom, so too is the traditional hot season for real estate. Unfortunately this also means some of Chicago’s historic housing stock gives way to new construction, much of it concentrated in near North and Northwest Side neighborhoods that developed in the 1870s and 1880s.

Last year we explored this phenomenon in The Emergence, Demolition, and Preservation of Italianate Cottages and Flats. Unsurprisingly, the trend continues in 2018 and isn’t slowing down. Those on the upper end of the income spectrum continue relocating closer to the city center, and with them, demands for high-end finishes and plentiful space.